Moral Distress: An Interprofessional Dialogue

Moral Distress Webinar

ACHHS webinars are free and open to paid members, Facebook group members (ACHHS or TCCSW), or if you are referred by a member, please include their name on your email when you rsvp.

We are working to becoming certified CEU providers for future webinars. Please check back on this post for updates.

To rsvp for this webinar, please send an email to admin@achhs.org. A zoom link will be emailed to you a few days before the event.

Discussion details:

The presenter will present for 30-40 minutes followed by question and answer/discussion.

Human service and helping professionals in mental health or healthcare settings who identify as religious or Christian may encounter situations of tensions between their deeply held faith and the profession’s ever changing cultural frameworks for helping. Specializing in pharmacotherapy, Dr. Marty Eng will lead us in an inter-professional discussion regarding how moral distress presents itself, how it affects providers of faith across disciplines in various settings, and how professionals can address these moral dilemmas within the context of the provider’s or client’s Biblical worldview. The various professions’ codes of ethics will be discussed to arrive at best practice of faith integration in serving clients/patients.

The goal of this presentation is to help attendees to:

  • define what constitutes moral distress,
  • identify moral components of respective professions,
  • identify the contributors and consequences of moral distress, and
  • apply a moral framework to a moral distress vignette.

What is Diverse Discussions?

  • Live Discussions for Christian helping professionals and students; conversations, interviews, and Q & A with experts and professionals.
  • Topics include working with diverse populations and challenging issues from a Christian worldview.
  • Focus is on integrating faith and practice to increase skills, knowledge, and ability to effectively engage and serve others in pluralistic contexts.
Moral Distress: An Interprofessional Dialogue
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